What is Wealth Management?

What is Wealth Management?

Wealth management can be more than just investment advice, as it can encompass all parts of a person’s financial life. The idea is that rather than trying to integrate pieces of advice and various products from different managers the client benefits from a holistic approach in which a single manager coordinates all the services needed to manage their money and plan for their own or their family’s current and future financial needs.

The concept of a wealth manager is based on the theory that he or she can provide services in any aspect of the financial field, while many mangers choose to specialize in particular areas. This would be based on the expertise of the wealth manager in question, or the primary focus of the business within which the wealth manager operates.

A wealth management advisor will coordinate input from outside financial experts such as the client’s own lawyers and, accountants, to create the best strategy to benefit the client. Some wealth managers also provide banking services or advice on philanthropic activities.

So, in short wealth management is an investment advisory service that combines other financial services to address the needs of a person’s financial life. Clients benefit from a holistic approach in which a single manager coordinates all the services needed to manage their money and plan for their own or their family’s current and future needs. This service is usually appropriate for individuals with an array of diverse needs.

Wealth managers may work as part of a small-scale business or as part of a larger firm, one generally associated with the finance industry. Depending on the business, wealth managers may function under different titles, like financial adviser. A client may receive services from a single designated wealth manager or may have access to members of a specified wealth management team.

The wealth manager starts by developing a plan that will maintain and increase a client’s wealth based on that individual’s financial situation, goals and comfort level of risk. After the plan is developed, the manager meets regularly with clients to update goals, review and rebalance the financial portfolio, and investigate whether additional services are needed, with the ultimate goal being to remain in the client’s service throughout their lifetime.

This brings us to financial security planning within Wealth Management

A sound financial security plan should protect you against uncontrollable events such as disabilities or death, while helping you plan for controllable events such as buying a new home and retiring comfortably. To do this, Henley Financial & Wealth Management planning process is based on four areas of financial security planning:

  • Financial security at death
  • Retirement
  • Liquidity
  • Disability and critical illness

Financial security at death

 All financial security plans start here because death is inevitable and an uncontrollable event. As part of the financial security planning process, we’ll discuss:

  • How much income will your family need if you die?
  • How will inflation affect this income?
  • How to preserve your estate for your family when you die

Retirement

 When we discuss retirement planning, we consider:

  • What kind of lifestyle do you see for yourself in retirement?
  • How much money will you need to retire comfortably?
  • What impact will inflation have on your income?
  • Would you like to have the freedom to slow down or retire early?

Time and planning are two factors that influence whether or not you accomplish your retirement goals. Therefore, you must work towards your retirement goals over time.

Liquidity

Liquidity is your ability to access cash or assets that are easily convertible to cash. Liquidity can be a short-term savings option that can regenerate over time and need your constant hard work.

Disability and critical illness

Mitigating your risk against uncontrollable events such as disability or critical illness is key to your financial security. When building your financial security plan, we’ll consider:

  • Will your income be reduced in the event of disability or critical illness?
  • If your income is reduced, will it be difficult for you to maintain your lifestyle and retirement savings?
  • How much disability or critical illness insurance coverage is enough?
  • What impact will inflation have on your income if you’re unable to work for a long time?
  • Do you know if your group benefits provide a provision to allow you to continue your retirement savings if you become disabled or suffer a critical condition or illness?

 

 

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What types of insurance are available?

What types of insurance are available?

Life insurance in the beginning was the benefit which was realized at the death of the policy holder. It was really “death insurance” which in today’s world would be a hard idea to sell. Today, the world of insurance has expanded to different types of insurance where you don’t have to die to win. While also providing benefits to the policy holders who are alive – a living benefit. Living benefit plans are insurance policies that provide financial benefits to survivors who face issues due to aging, illness, accidents and dependency.

Disability insurance

Disability insurance (sometimes referred to as DI) is an insurance policy that pays out a stream of monthly income in case you get disabled and cannot work. The injury or disability does not have to have happened at work but it must severe enough to prevent you from working and earning an income. Many people have both short-term disability and long-term disability coverage through work but you can buy personal disability policies if there is not coverage like in the case of some self-employed individuals.

 Health and dental coverage

Health and dental plans are often covered through group benefits. These plans are designed to help with the unexpected cost of healthcare needs when you need it. There is a growing concern that governments will have significant cut backs in the health care industry and as a result, the financial burden of prescription drugs, visits to the dentist, eye exams, and paramedical services may increase in the future. Individual Health and Dental insurance policies can also be purchased through insurance companies.

Travel insurance

Travel insurance is something you can buy when you travel outside of Canada in case you get sick or have an accident while you are away. Travel insurance can cover the cost of your medical emergencies. Travel insurance may or may not include trip cancellation coverage. Most travel agencies will offer travel insurance coverage. However, you can also choose to purchase from a third party. If you’re planning your trip online or on your own, you’ll have to research which insurance companies are best for your needs.

Critical illness insurance

Critical illness insurance is a type of insurance that helps you if you become critically ill. There are many different conditions that might be covered under a critical illness policy but the most common are heart attacks, strokes, and cancer. Typically, critical illness insurance provides a lump sum payment when a specific condition is diagnosed. The money can then be used for any purpose. Some examples include finding alternative medical treatments anywhere in the world, hiring a caregiver, paying debts, covering expenses that are not covered under government health care, paying for private nursing homes, or providing income support.

 Long term care insurance

Long-term care insurance is another coverage that is rapidly growing in popularity. It pays a daily or monthly benefit for medical or custodial care received in a nursing facility, in a hospital, or at home if you are unable to carry out some of the common activities of daily living (ADLs). Some examples include:
· Bathing
· Dressing and undressing
· Eating
· Transferring from bed to chair, and back
· Voluntarily controlling urinary and fecal discharge
· Using the toilet
· Walking (not bedridden)

Few people plan to get injured or ill. Getting insurance of any kind is a form of risk management . . . preparing for unfortunate circumstances in life. Be sure to include a review of living benefits when you review other types of insurance.

 

 

The uncertainty of self isolation… leads to dealing with uncertainty!

The uncertainty of self isolation… leads to dealing with uncertainty!

The most unsettling thing about this time in our lives is not the prospect of self-isolation or social distancing. We seem to be fine with doing what we have to do to win this race for humanity. I’m sure people are happy to wash their hands a skill that was honed in youth ingrained by our parents who knew there would be a time in life we would need this basic skill set in life to survive.

What’s unsettling about this whole crisis, is not knowing when this will end or the uncertainty of time. It would seem many are fine with an infinite time line because that’s how it has to be.

Normally we would just to trust in the experts. Although in this case every day you can read an expert’s article that is opposite of what was published yesterday because this is an unknown.

We have absolutely no way of telling which experts are right. Many have provided different information because there are so many theories or timelines regarding this virus. Because of this our testing protocol may be different by region, province and even countries. The reporting remains a mystery as to or even if it has been reported correctly. We can have no opinion on this because this has been decided for us. There are conflicting numbers, results and treatments. There is also a lack of trust in some that are giving the orders. That in itself, for us, is deeply unnerving. We have always had an opinion regarding politics, sports, music, restaurants, and just about everything in life as this is our freedom. How do we know who’s right and who’s wrong, that’s the part that feels not just weird, but unsettling? The freedom to think for ourselves seems to have been put on hold at least for now. This comfort has abruptly been taken away as we struggle to find factual ways to inform ourselves.

That aside only thing I am sure about: Is that many can work from home and they will be fine, this will become the new normal.  The front-line workers who are there to provide for those in need will be exhausted when this is over.  Unfortunately, they will have to carry on providing this essential service to many that are and have been sick but not from Covid-19. There will be no break for them this will not end with a month or two of self-isolation or so we hope.  Deemed essential businesses will continue to forge ahead… But those owners and employees who cannot work because of circumstances beyond their control are the ones we should worry about.  There is no prospect or timeline to return to work. How will they survive this economic downturn and be able to carry on business as usual? It’s easy to say stay home flatten the curve, but even if these businesses made rent or the mortgage payment this month. What happens next month or the month after?  We as a society cannot flood the market after business returns to normal as most will have their own financial issues to sort through. With no timeline in site the future of these businesses looks dim and jobs will be lost creating a secondary strain moving forward. Unfortunately, for every action taken there will be a consequence and that is the unsettling part.

Keep calm, but don’t carry on

The Spanish flu of 1918-20 – which infected a third of the global population, and, if estimates are correct, killed more people than the two world wars combined. It was of course a different disease, and a different time. But there are many lessons to draw from what happened. For example: “Keep calm and carry on” isn’t always good advice. Hence the reason we have stopped life as we know it. Now we understand panic is dangerous and on the other hand, complacency is also dangerous.

The fear for us right now is not knowing when the end is in sight. We realize there will be an end because we are taking the right steps to ensure the outcome trying to save lives and stop this virus in its tracks.  The uncertainty is more of a time line… Will it be 20 more days, 30 days, 60 days or 90 days? Because all of these time lines have different consequences to each and every individual moving forward regardless of his and her circumstances.  What would your economic situation look like if this continued till June? Some have the means to survive till then others do not.

What choices do we have? We have lost that freedom for now, at least some of us have because we abide by the rules. We know that this will end, but will we change moving forward or chase the dream again… Only time will tell.

I guess the one good thing to come out of this is the return of the family unit as the core of our existence. We have returned again to our roots ingrained by our parents – family first! Something we may as a society been too busy for in the past or took for granted.  Let’s hope that we don’t turn our backs on the family unit again. On the other hand, some children have been expelled from homeschooling already so yes, an adjustment period is required. The future is in our hands (literally… wash our hands!) we have a choice it would be unsettling to know that we have come this far to not win!

I guess the ending is simple we must stay the course even though we have no defined time line in sight. As unsettling as this may be to some, we must Stay Calm Relax and this too shall pass.

Writing this just seemed to make things more acceptable because like many I’m sure, I have not trained for a race of this distance. The finish line seems too far to complete but I shall not let the team down and will find a way to finish.

 

Sorry to burst your bubble, but owning a home won’t fund your retirement

Sorry to burst your bubble, but owning a home won’t fund your retirement

As I was looking through past articles I saw this and was intrigued. There are many who will do well when they “downsize” their family home as the article states. But with the cost of housing even for a smaller home or condo on the rise the nest egg is becoming much smaller for the younger (45 -55) home owner. My thoughts are simple, if you have a Million dollar home that you want to sell and downsize to a $500,000 home. You probably don’t need to worry about your retirement fund, you will have the money you require to live a wonderful life.  Unfortunately everyone does not own a million dollar home, and everyone will not be able to “down size” to a smaller home at half the cost of their present home. Baby Boomers will be able to take advantage of today’s real estate market. But generations X, Y and Z will need a better plan for the future.

Everyone requires a solid financial plan your financial plan can, and should include downsizing the family home. Which economically, physically and mentally, will make sense as you grow older. But again as the article states this is only a piece of the puzzle.

As you read the article, if you have any questions, or require any help with your financial plan please contact us at Henley Financial and Wealth Management .

All the best.

Winston L. Cook

A disturbing number of people are building their retirement plans on a weak foundation – their homes.

Years of strong price gains in some cities have convinced some people that real estate is the best vehicle for building wealth, ahead of stocks, bonds and funds. Perhaps inevitably, there’s now a view that owning a home can also pay for your retirement.


home buying puzzle

Don’t buy into the group-think about home ownership being the key to wealth. Except in a few circumstances, the equity in your home won’t pay for retirement. You will sell your home at some point in retirement and use the proceeds to buy your next residence, be it a condo, townhouse, bungalow or accommodation at a retirement home of some type. There may be money left over after you sell, but not enough to cover your long-term income needs in retirement.
In a recent study commissioned by the Investor Office of the Ontario Securities Commission, retirement-related issues topped the list of financial concerns of Ontario residents who were 45 and older. Three-quarters of the 1,516 people in the survey own their own home. Within this group, 37 per cent said they are counting on increases in the value of their home to provide for their retirement.

The survey results for pre-retirees – people aged 45 to 54 – suggest a strong link between financial vulnerability and a belief in home equity as a way to pay for retirement. Those most likely to rely on their homes had larger mortgages, smaller investment portfolios, lower income and were most often living in the Greater Toronto Area. They were also the least likely to have started saving for retirement or have any sort of plan or strategy for retirement.

The OSC’s Investor Office says the risk in using a home for retirement is that you get caught in a residential real estate market correction that reduces property values. While housing has resisted a sharp, sustained drop in prices, there’s no getting around the fact that financial assets of all types have their up and down cycles.

But even if prices keep chugging higher, you’re limited to these four options if you want your house to largely fund your retirement:

  • Move to a more modest home in your city;
  • Move to a smaller community with a cheaper real estate market, probably located well away from your current location;
  • Sell your home and rent;
  • Take out a reverse mortgage or use a home equity line of credit, which means borrowing against your home equity.

A lot of people want to live large in retirement, which can mean moving to a more urban location and buying something smaller but also nicer. With the boomer generation starting to retire, this type of housing is in strong demand and thus expensive to buy. Prediction: We will see more people who take out mortgages to help them downsize to the kind of home they want for retirement.

Selling your home and renting will put a lot of money in your hands, but you’ll need a good part of it to cover future rental costs. As for borrowing against home equity, it’s not yet something the masses are comfortable doing. Sales of reverse mortgages are on the rise, but they’re still a niche product.

Rising house prices have made a lot of money for long-time owners in some cities, but not enough to cover retirement’s full cost. So strive for a diversified retirement plan – some money left over after you sell your house, your own savings in a tax-free savings account and registered retirement savings plan, and other sources such as a company pension, an annuity, the Canada Pension Plan and Old Age Security.

Pre-retirees planning to rely on their home at least have the comfort of knowing they’ve benefited from years of price gains. Far more vulnerable are the young adults buying into today’s already elevated real estate markets. They’re much less likely to benefit from big price increases than their parents were, and their ability to save may be compromised by the hefty mortgages they’re forced to carry.

Whatever age you are, your house will likely play some role in your retirement planning. But it’s no foundation. You have to build that yourself.

Planning for the future…

Planning for the future…

I’ve been asked many times about the taking your Canada Pension Plan (or CPP) early. It’s one of the issues facing seniors and income management of their retirement funds, my conclusion is that it makes sense to take CPP as early as you can in most cases.  Again there are a number of factors that can determine this process and they should be considered. We can help you understand which makes the most sense for you. Contact us at Henley Financial & Wealth Management.

In seeking the answer of when to take your CPP – ask yourself these five questions…

1) When will you retire?

Under the old rules, you had to stop working in order to collect your CPP benefit. The work cessation rules were confusing, misinterpreted and difficult to enforce so it’s probably a good thing they are a thing of the past.

Now you can start collecting CPP as soon as you turn 60 and you no longer have to stop working. The catch is that as long as you’re working, you must keep paying into CPP even if you are collecting it. The good news is that paying into it will also increase your future benefit.

2) How long will you live?

This is a question that no one can really answer so assume Life Expectancy to be the age factor when considering the question. At present a Male has a life expectancy of 82 and a female has a life expectancy of 85. These vales change based on lifestyle and health factors but it gives us a staring point.

Under the old rules, the decision to collect CPP early was really based on a mathematical calculation of the break-even point. Before 2012, this break-even point was age 77. With the new rules, every Canadian needs to understand the math.

If you qualify for CPP of $502 per month at age 65, let’s say you decide to take CPP at age 60 at a reduced amount while instead of waiting till 65 knowing you will get more income by deferring the income for 5 years.

Under Canada Pension Plan benefits, you can take income at age 60 based on a reduction factor of 0.6% for each month prior to your 65th birthday. Therefore your benefit will be reduced by 36% (0.6% x 60 months) for a monthly income of $321.28 starting on your 60th birthday.

Now fast-forward 5 years. You are now 65. Over the last 5 years, you have collected $321.28 per month totalling $19,276.80. In other words, your income made until age 60 was $19,276.80 before you even started collecting a single CPP cheque if you waited until age 65. That being said, at age 65 you are now going to get $502 per month for CPP. The question is how many months do you need to collect more pension at the age of 65 to make up the $19,276.80 you are ahead by starting at age 60? With simple math it will take you a 109 months (or 9 years) to make up the $19,276.80. So at age 74, you are ahead if you start taking the money at age 60, you start to fall behind at age 75.

The math alone is still a very powerful argument for taking CPP early.

So, “How long do you expect to live?”

3) When will need the money?

When are you most likely to enjoy the money?  Before the age 74 or after age 74, for most people, they live there best years of their retirement in the early years. Therefore a little extra income in the beginning helps offset the cost of an active early retirement. Some believe it’s better to have a higher income later because of the rising costs of health care and this is when you are most likely to need care.  Whatever you believe, you need to plan your future financial security.  It is hard to know whether you will become unhealthy in the future but what we do know is most of the travelling, golfing, fishing, hiking and the things you want to do and see are usually done in the early years of retirement.

4) What happens if you delay taking your CPP?

Let’s go back to age 60 you could collect $321.28 per month. Let’s you decide to delay taking CPP by one year to age 61. So what’s happens next? $3,855.36 from her CPP ($321.28 x 12 months), but chose not to, so you are able to get more money in the future. That’s fine as long as you live long enough to get back the money that you left behind. Again, it comes back to the math. For every year you delay taking CPP when you could have taken it, you must live one year longer at the other end to get it back. By delaying CPP for one year, you must live to age 75 to get back the $3,855.36 that you left behind. If you delay taking CPP until 62, then you have to live until 76 to get back the two years of money you left behind.

Why wouldn’t you take it early given the math? The only reason I can think of is that you think you will live longer and you will need more money, as you get older.

Any way the math adds up… you can always take the money early and if you don’t need it  put it in a TFSA and let it make interest. You can use it later in life if you choose.

 

Heaven can wait… along as you plan for the road ahead.

Heaven can wait… along as you plan for the road ahead.

A person sacrifices his/her health to make money.  Then they sacrifice money to recuperate their health.  They become so anxious about the future that they do not enjoy the present; the result being that they do not live in the present or the future; they live as they are never going to die, only to die never really lived.  Dalai Lama

So when I’m asked what I do?

The answer is simple!  I help you take care of the future so you don’t have worry, thus allowing you to live for today and tomorrow. I help you succeed!

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According to the Dalai Lama, “a person sacrifices their health to make money”.  So what if I told you I can help you protect your money so you don’t have to sacrifice your health.

When creating our wealth we are often confronted with the risk of not accumulating enough for our future.  During the accumulation phase of life (accumulation phase –  is when we earn money) it is critical that we save for the future, so we can continue to enjoy a comfortable lifestyle into retirement. Our lifestyle ambitions requires us to earn our dreams.  In some cases we tend live beyond our earning potential.  Saving for retirement is often complicated, difficult and a time-consuming task for many.  We often see people delay saving for the future because they want more now.  This is where I can help you succeed.  I work with you to help give you that future so you can live today, within your earning potential, and not worry about tomorrow.  I help make your life simple through planning.

How?

 If I could…

Take the volatility out of the market would you be interested?

Help you protect your assets would you be interested?

Help you protect your earning power would you be interested?

Help you protect your earning potential would you be interested?

If you answered yes, to any of these questions above, it’s time for us to start planning together.  Plan for your future so you can live in the present…let me do what I do best.

I can help you find money that you did not know you were losing willingly or unknowingly by taking the volatility out of the markets.  In doing so I will help you Protect Your Assets through Wills, Health Benefits, Estate planning, and Long Term Care.  I will help you Protect Your Earning Power through Living Benefits.  Finally, I will help you Protect Your Earning Potential with the use of Life Insurance.

This is what I do! I help you plan for the future so you can live in the present. I help you succeed!

So is the Dalai Lama right?  Do we have to sacrifice health for life style?

As long as we do what we love and love what we do!   We know that life is good.  We must enjoy the present as we never know what lies ahead.  So live for today and plan for tomorrow.  If done correctly we will not have to sacrifice our health for lifestyle.

Do you have to sacrifice your money to recoup your health?

In life we are sometimes thrown a curve ball, and our ability to deal with any health issue that comes our way is vital to our recovery.  If planned correctly you will never have to sacrifice the future for the present.  Depending on the health issues you will have a plan in place so that the road to recovery is all that you will have to concern yourself with.

Although the Dali Lama says that people don’t enjoy today because they worry about the past and the future.  I believe that if you plan your personal and families financial security with a vision and purpose you can indeed live worry free to enjoy today.

Unfortunately, we all will die at some point, as it is the cycle life we know.  Live life, enjoy your present and future.

The purpose of our life is to be happy.  Dali Lama

Start planning today and be happy tomorrow.

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If interested contact me  @ http://www.henleyfinancial.ca

A living Benefit: Critical Illness Insurance; Do I need It?

A living Benefit: Critical Illness Insurance; Do I need It?

 

  1. Do I need it?
  2. Isn’t it expensive?
  3. Is it too complex and confusing?
  4. What about the underwriting?

Let’s examine each of these four questions.

 1. Do you actually feel no need for this product?

Research tells us 77% Canadians are concerned with lifestyle and health costs if they became critically ill.  A further 84% were concerned with the government’s ability to fund the current healthcare system.  Those concerns are not unfounded.  A survey from 2014 found that 41% of retirees retired because of personal health.

Just like life insurance, critical illness coverage is likely suitable for people under age 65 (CI coverage is often cost-prohibitive after that age).  CI coverage can help anyone whose illness would cause financial liabilities (e.g., debt, bills) for a spouse or dependent.  Often, the money is used to replace lost income when disability coverage doesn’t pay out, which can happen if the insured’s condition is not severe enough to satisfy a doctor’s opinion of someone’s inability to work for a sustained period.  CI simply pays out upon diagnosis of specific illnesses.  Also, single people who don’t see a need life insurance could benefit from CI coverage as they could use the payout to replace lost income and pay for caregiving services.

2. Is critical illness expensive?

Every person who qualifies for CI insurance should own at least enough to cover a year of lifestyle expenses (salary).  This would give most people up to a year of expense coverage to allow them to make choices that focus on recovery from illness.  A 35-year-old Female non-smoker can buy $100,000 10 – year term  for around $35 per month.

There are various ways to set up your CI policy depending on what you want out of the product.  If you want the product to cover you short term while your family is young and you are concerned about the cost, the 10-year term coverage is a good option.  There are options that allow you to keep the coverage over a longer period, and there is even an option to return all of your premiums if you do not use coverage after a specified period of time.  When looking at this coverage it can be built to fit your needs and wants with regards to cost.

Cheap and expensive are relative terms.

What impact would $100,000 of protection have on your finances?  If you had to withdraw $100,000 from your RRSP, it could cost up to $150,000  before tax, depending on your marginal tax rate.  That $150,000 could have been worth $300,000 or more at retirement, depending on time and growth rates.  Remember that $35.00 a month for 10-year Critical Illness coverage could have change that equation in your favor.

3. Is CI too complex to understand?

The product which was originally designed by a doctor in South Africa to aid patients in paying for treatment upon diagnosis of a life-altering illness.  This idea is somehow deemed to be more complex than any other insurance product on the market.  I think it’s all about understanding why you need this coverage.

Let me ask you these two questions below:

Do you know someone that is close to you that is healthy?

What if they went to the doctor because they have not been feeling well for a little while. But it’s nothing that resonates as a major illness. Remember they live a healthy life and they are healthy.

After a brief consultation with the doctor, blood work and diagnostic tests are ordered. The results come back and the doctor office calls your healthy friend to set up an appointment. During this appointment, the doctor informs them that they now have a Life-Altering Illness.

But they were healthy… how is this possible?  A critical Illness does not pick or choose!

If they don’t have Critical Illness coverage how would they fund the treatment and recovery they will require?

All of a sudden this coverage does not seem very complicated to understand.  As we know life altering Illnesses can happen to anyone and has happened too often amongst our friends and families.

4. Is critical illness insurance hard to qualify for?

Anyone who has a family history of hereditary issues will have a tougher time qualifying.  That is not to say you will not qualify, there is a rating system in place to provide coverage if you are deemed high risk.  The majority of people who apply will qualify for standard offers if they are healthy.

You need to take a holistic, risk management approach and determine all risks so that illness protection and a life insurance plan work together.

The banks are the number one writers of this coverage for their Mortgages and Lines of Credit products.  What you need to know is it always cheaper when dealing directly with an insurance company.  Put the money back in your pocket!  A good Financial Planner will help you find money you have been spending unknowingly or unwillingly. This is just one example of you spending money unknowingly – find an advisor start saving now.

As always if you have any questions regarding Living Benefits Insurance, Financial Security or Financial Planning please contact us at Henley Financial and Wealth Management.

You may also contact us at the following Info@henleyfinancial.ca

Do you really need 10 reasons?

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We live in a world that is filled with the uncertainty of what might happen. Life Insurance protects your loved ones in the event of your death. It can provide future income to your family if you were to passaway during your prime working years, and it may also be used to pay debt, such as a mortgage, final and emergency expenses.

Life Insurance is the most selfless act a person cando for their family, as the person that is insured will never benefit from the coverage.
Before obtaining Life Insurance here are some things to consider.

1. The Best Time is now:
The cost of Critical Illness insurance policies will never decline, the costs will only ever increase. So the best time to get Critical Illness Insurance is now.

2. Receive Cash Back:
In Canada there is a Critical Illness plan that enables you to receive a portion of your premiums to be returned after a specified time frame. Which means if a client doesn’t need to make a claim and feels they won’t, they can cancel the policy and receive repayment based on the percentage of premium paid, all the while having coverage just in case

3. Purchase while you are healthy:
Critical Illness coverage can only be purchased while you are healthy. Once an illness has been diagnosed you are not eligible to purchase it.

4. Tax free lump Payment:
When a claim is made with Personal Critical Illness coverage, it pays out a lump sum, tax free to the insured. The payment is in the amount that has been agreed upon when the policy is taken.

5. One less Worry:
Personal Critical Illness allows the insured to take the time that is necessary to recover without worry as to how the day to day expenses or additional medical services not paid by the provincial health plan. There isn’t a prearranged allocation for the payment, so all of the payout goes to the insured.

6. Additional coverage:
You can purchase Critical Illness coverage on a mortgage, however, these types of plans only cover three illnesses such as cancer, heart attack and stroke. Alternatively, Personal Critical Illness policies cover these three illnesses as well as 22 others; all of which we hear about almost daily.

7. Not included in most employers plans:
In most employee benefit group plans, Critical Illness is not always offered. In the rare instance that it is indicated on a group policy, it is often not near the recommended coverage amount.

8. Best Doctors:
Personal Critical Illness coverage allows you access to Best Doctors. Best Doctors is a group of the best Doctors worldwide that are experts in specific areas of medicine. Once a claimis made, your file is put before a panel of Doctors to review and determine whether the diagnosis is correct and the course of treatment is the best for the diagnosis.

9. Coverage for children:
Critical Illness can be purchased to insure people from newborns and up to the age of 65. Some carriers allow you to insure children for up to five illnesses, where as adults can be covered forup to 25 illnesses.

10: Peace of mind:
Critical Illness policies are underwritten at the time of the application process. Meaning that we will know if the client is covered up front and not left to chance at claim time.
What’s next?

Contact us… http://www.henleyfinancial.ca
info@henleyfinancial.ca

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