A tax-free compounding account… In your portfolio that may have been over looked – $52,000 for each spouse to be exact, start planning now!

The tax-free savings account (TFSA) is starting to grow up.

Introduced in the 2008 federal budget and coming into effect on Jan. 1, 2009, the TFSA has become an integral part of financial planning in Canada, with the lifetime contribution limit now set to reach $52,000 in 2017.

Start taking advantage of this savings today.

Remember when you thought $5,000 did not amount to much as an investment. If you had taken advantage of this program you could have another $60,000 to $70,000 for each husband and wife invested in savings today. That’s $120,00 -$140,000 of Tax free Value based on the average market return since 2009.

Used correctly the TFSA can supplement income lowering your tax base during retirement. The gain made in a TFSA is tax-free, and therefore so are withdrawals — Did you know? That the money coming out of the account does not count as income in terms of the clawback for Old Age Security, which starts at $74,780 in 2017.

The TFSA has also become a great vehicle for dealing with a sudden influx of wealth. For people who downsize and sell their house or receive an inheritance, this money is already tax-free. Do not make it taxable in the hands of the government again.

Contact me for more information regarding this and other investments that have been overlooked. It never hurts to get a second opinion regarding your future.

 

Heaven can wait… along as you plan for the road ahead.

Heaven can wait… along as you plan for the road ahead.

A person sacrifices his/her health to make money.  Then they sacrifice money to recuperate their health.  They become so anxious about the future that they do not enjoy the present; the result being that they do not live in the present or the future; they live as they are never going to die, only to die never really lived.  Dalai Lama

So when I’m asked what I do?

The answer is simple!  I help you take care of the future so you don’t have worry, thus allowing you to live for today and tomorrow. I help you succeed!

whatdoyoudo

According to the Dalai Lama, “a person sacrifices their health to make money”.  So what if I told you I can help you protect your money so you don’t have to sacrifice your health.

When creating our wealth we are often confronted with the risk of not accumulating enough for our future.  During the accumulation phase of life (accumulation phase –  is when we earn money) it is critical that we save for the future, so we can continue to enjoy a comfortable lifestyle into retirement. Our lifestyle ambitions requires us to earn our dreams.  In some cases we tend live beyond our earning potential.  Saving for retirement is often complicated, difficult and a time-consuming task for many.  We often see people delay saving for the future because they want more now.  This is where I can help you succeed.  I work with you to help give you that future so you can live today, within your earning potential, and not worry about tomorrow.  I help make your life simple through planning.

How?

 If I could…

Take the volatility out of the market would you be interested?

Help you protect your assets would you be interested?

Help you protect your earning power would you be interested?

Help you protect your earning potential would you be interested?

If you answered yes, to any of these questions above, it’s time for us to start planning together.  Plan for your future so you can live in the present…let me do what I do best.

I can help you find money that you did not know you were losing willingly or unknowingly by taking the volatility out of the markets.  In doing so I will help you Protect Your Assets through Wills, Health Benefits, Estate planning, and Long Term Care.  I will help you Protect Your Earning Power through Living Benefits.  Finally, I will help you Protect Your Earning Potential with the use of Life Insurance.

This is what I do! I help you plan for the future so you can live in the present. I help you succeed!

So is the Dalai Lama right?  Do we have to sacrifice health for life style?

As long as we do what we love and love what we do!   We know that life is good.  We must enjoy the present as we never know what lies ahead.  So live for today and plan for tomorrow.  If done correctly we will not have to sacrifice our health for lifestyle.

Do you have to sacrifice your money to recoup your health?

In life we are sometimes thrown a curve ball, and our ability to deal with any health issue that comes our way is vital to our recovery.  If planned correctly you will never have to sacrifice the future for the present.  Depending on the health issues you will have a plan in place so that the road to recovery is all that you will have to concern yourself with.

Although the Dali Lama says that people don’t enjoy today because they worry about the past and the future.  I believe that if you plan your personal and families financial security with a vision and purpose you can indeed live worry free to enjoy today.

Unfortunately, we all will die at some point, as it is the cycle life we know.  Live life, enjoy your present and future.

The purpose of our life is to be happy.  Dali Lama

Start planning today and be happy tomorrow.

If you liked this article please like my Henley Financial & Wealth Management Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/HenleyFinancialandWealthMangement

If interested contact me  @ http://www.henleyfinancial.ca

Are you Missing out?

Are you Missing out?

A tax-free compounding account… In your portfolio that has been overlooked.

Check us out… Henley Financial and Wealth Management

The tax-free savings account is starting to grow up.

Introduced in the 2008 federal budget and coming into effect on Jan. 1, 2009, the TFSA has become an integral part of financial planning in Canada, with the lifetime contribution limit set to reach $52,000 in 2017, provided you were 18 at the time it came into existence.

Remember when you thought $5,000 did not amount to much as an investment. You would have another $60,000 to $70,000 for each husband and wife if you have been maximizing their contribution and based on the market’s return since 2009.

Used correctly the TFSA can supplement income lower your tax base during retirement. As the gains made in the TFSA are tax-free, and so are withdrawals —Did you know that the money coming out of the account does not count as income in terms of the clawback for Old Age Security, which starts at $74,780 in 2017.

The TFSA has also become a great vehicle for dealing with a sudden influx of wealth. For people sell their house or receive an inheritance. That money is already tax-free you don’t want to make it taxable in the hands of the government again.

With that in mind, and the new year limit increase upon us, here are eight things Canadians need to know about TFSAs.

How did we get to $52,000?

The first four years of the program, the annual contribution limit was $5,000 but that increased to $5,500 in 2013 and 2014 under a formula that indexes contributions to inflation. The Tories increased the annual contribution limit to $10,000 in 2015 but the Liberals quickly repealed that when they came into power and reduced annual contributions to $5,500 for 2016, still indexed to inflation. The annual number increases in increments of $500 but inflation was not riding high enough to boost the annual figure to $6,000 for 2017 so we are stuck at $5,500. That brings us to the current $52,000. The good news is even if you’ve never contributed before, that contribution room kept growing based on the year in which you turned 18.

Eligible investments

For the most part, whatever is permitted in an RRSP, can go into a TFSA. That includes cash, mutual funds, securities listed on a designated stock exchange, guaranteed investment certificates, bonds and certain shares of small business corporations. You can contribute foreign funds but they will be converted to Canadian dollars, which cannot exceed your TFSA contribution room.

Unused room

As the TFSA limit has grown, so has the unused room in Canadians’ accounts. A poll from Tangerine Bank in 2014 found that even after the Tories increased the annual limit, a move that ended up as a one-time annual bump, 56 per cent of people were still unaware of the larger contribution limit. In 2015, only about one in five Canadians with a TFSA had maximized the contribution room in their account, according to documents from the Canada Revenue Agency.

Withdrawal and redeposit rules

For the most part, you can withdraw any amount from the TFSA at any time and it will not reduce the total amount of contributions you have already made for the year. The tricky part is the repayment rules. If you decide to replace or re-contribute all or a portion of your withdrawals into your TFSA in the same year, you can only do so if you have available TFSA contribution room. Otherwise, you must wait until Jan. 1 of the next year. The penalty for over-contributing is 1 per cent of the highest excess TFSA amount in the month, for each month that the excess amount remains in your account.

Is the Canada Revenue Agency still auditing TFSAs?

The Canada Revenue Agency continues to investigate some Canadians — less than one per cent — who have very high balances in their accounts. Active traders in speculative products seem to be the main trigger. Expects an appeal of the current rules regarding TFSA investments to be heard in February.

Be careful on foreign investments

If a stock pays foreign dividends, you could find yourself subject to a withholding tax. While in a non-registered account you get a foreign tax credit for the amount of foreign taxes withheld, if the dividends are paid to your TFSA, no foreign tax credit is available. For U.S. stocks, while, there is an exemption from withholding tax under the Canada-U.S. tax treaty for U.S. dividends paid to an RRSP or RRIF, this exemption does not apply to U.S. dividends paid to a TFSA.

What are people investing their TFSA in?

People are still heavily into cash and close to cash holdings. A study from two years ago, found 44 per cent of holdings in TFSAs were in a high-interest savings accounts. Another 21 per cent were in guaranteed investment certificates. If you want to see your money grow you also have to respect your risk tolerance. You may want to look at your investment horizon.

TFSA vs RRSP

It’s hard to generalize which is better for a typical Canadian. RRSPs are generally geared towards reducing your taxable income when your marginal rate is high and then withdrawing the money in retirement when your income will theoretically be much lower. The answer is easy if you make $10,000 a year and you’re a young person — the TFSA is better — but the deduction you get from RRSP contributions are only part of the equation. It also depends on the flexibility that you are looking for. Once you get to the higher marginal rate that deduction is attractive but nothing stops you from taking that deduction and putting it in a TFSA and getting the benefit of both.

 

Growing Old is Inevitable, Growing up is Optional! But we do have to deal with it…

Growing Old is Inevitable, Growing up is Optional! But we do have to deal with it…

It’s that time again Labour day has come and gone the kids are back in school meaning that summer has unofficially ended. We are back and will have some helpful insights for you to read over the next few months.  All the best from Henley Financial and Wealth Management. www.henleyfinancial.ca

Over the last year, I have been dealing with my mother who has decided that she would like to see my father again. The problem is he died 30 years ago. Yes he left us at the age of 52, the loss was hard but at that time my mother had lots of friends to entertain and years later I started a family. So she always busy and felt needed. Up until a few years ago, my mother was needed as she helped with my children. That has all changed, the girls are now teenagers and don’t even want my help and her friends have passed or moved on so she has been left feeling as though she is no longer needed.  A few years ago, I was telling everyone that she would outlive me. But things changed, life changed, she took her final trip, a trip she had asked me to go on when I was a teenager and of course I refused. It was at a time when I was involved in sports and could not leave my teammates behind. She has traveled extensively but this was her dream destination a month-long trip to China.

 

She has always been a good saver and lives minimally, as she gets older, you can see she is overwhelmed by the costs of things. Her generation is very concerned about finances it is the way they have come through life. Most people over 75 have filled out forms that are 20 pages in length, or do their own income taxes, they live on small incomes, there are Guaranteed Income Supplement forms to fill out, and in her case, a small pension my father left her.

 

As it turns out I have found to maintain their independence, older seniors like my mom need a lot of help with their finances—even if they have healthy savings. Home-care services need to be paid for, bill payments need to be set up, and investments need to be managed. It’s a balancing act and the process is time-consuming, but it needs to be done if you want your parents to age comfortably. Unfortunately, my mother is not aging comfortably as she is suffering from kidney failure and a poor heart. She would not go to the doctor when she was sick she did not think it was necessary… she felt she is no longer needed.

 

Handling elderly parents’ finances is made even tougher by the awkward role reversal. Aging parents are often reluctant to even share financial information with their children, let alone relinquish control. My mother is that in a nutshell. She continues to refuse help on any level. In many cases, you may have no choice but to pick a neutral person to oversee a parent’s finances.

 

That’s why it’s important to do some advance planning before your parents become incapable of managing their money themselves. Every family should have a plan to safeguard their elderly parents’ finances when the time comes.

 

If your parents are having trouble handling their finances, don’t expect them to come to you for help. If they’re like most parents, they don’t want to be a burden. So be on the lookout for subtle signs they may be having problems. Can’t remember if they paid a bill or think they did pay the bill. If they repeat things often, or forget conversations you recently had. I do that to on occasion I guess that comes with age but you will start to notice the signs.

 

Ideally, communication between parents and siblings should start well before a parent needs help. The best time is when parents are starting to talk seriously about retirement. It’s just an intellectual activity then. The longer you leave it, the harder it will become.

 

Understand that total trust doesn’t happen overnight, I have not always had a good relationship with my mother but as an only child there is not much choice. In many cases, it’s hard for siblings to work well together. One often feels another is taking advantage. The key to making it work is transparency on all fronts.

 

Have frequent family gatherings or communicate by email or phone constantly speak candidly about retirement and old age. It will happen it’s not a secret. You should also talk about what happened in the meeting that transpired with lawyers, accountants, and advisors. Then you will be able to understand the process in the future.

 

Gather information

Find out where your parents keep their safety deposit box and important documents. Make a list of their bank accounts and investment accounts, insurance documents, wills and the names of their accountant, lawyer, and financial advisor.

Open a joint bank account with your parents, deposit their CPP and OAS checks into it, and take over all bill payments. You should also find out where your parents’ income comes from, including government and employer pensions as well as RRIF withdrawals and any income from their investment portfolio. Find out who their beneficiaries are, what their financial wishes are, and how they want funeral arrangements handled.

 

Get legal power

While both parents are alive, make sure all non-registered accounts are held jointly: otherwise the surviving parent will need a will and death certificate to access those accounts. Also, ensure your parents have an up-to-date will and estate plan. A loss of capacity either suddenly, such as through a stroke, or gradually as with Alzheimer’s, may mean they never have the opportunity to clarify their intentions.

That’s why it’s also key to know if your parents have in place a power of attorney (POA) for health care as well as for finances and property. A POA will often name a child as a substitute decision maker. That person can sign documents, start or defend a lawsuit, sell a property, make investments, and purchase things for the parent, the POA usually comes into effect as soon as it’s signed and witnessed, but a parent can put a clause in saying it doesn’t come into effect until they’re incapacitated.

 

More than one person can be named as a POA: that way no one can act opportunistically and without accountability. If you’re concerned about mismanagement of funds, make sure your parents include a clause in their POA document that requires the decision maker to submit periodic financial statements to your parents’ accountant, adviser or lawyer.

 

10 key questions to ask your aging parents

You can start by asking your parents these key questions to ensure your family is prepared for the road ahead.

  1. Where do you keep your important papers—wills, investment account statements, life insurance policies, and others?
  2. Do you have a current will? Where do you keep it and when was the last time you updated it?
  3. Have you prepared a power of attorney (POA) documents? A POA designates who will take care of your affairs if you are unable to do so because of illness or cognitive decline. Your parents can designate one person to handle health decisions and another for financial decisions, or they can designate one person for both roles.
  4. Do you have a safety deposit box? If so, at which bank, and where do you keep the key?
  5. Where are your bank accounts? If you are incapacitated, where would I find the PIN and account information?
  6. Do you have credit cards and if so, who are they with? Have you been paying the balance off every month?
  7. Do you have a financial adviser, lawyer or accountant, and what is their contact information?
  8. Do you have life insurance policies? Who is the contact agent?
  9. Do you have any debt and if so, with whom? How much do you owe?
  10. Does anyone owe you money and if so, who?

Hopefully, this will help you start that conversation. I know from experience that once they get sick they have no interest in sharing information.

 

Do you have a plan?

Do you have a plan?

Most people are concerned about having enough money to meet their obligations at or in retirement. Using traditional planning methods such as buy term and invest the difference, and live off the earnings and retain capital are the most common methods used today.

This type of planning only works if you follow a regimented plan and you don’t spend the difference.  If you fail to invest the rest… it lessens the quality of life that one should be able to enjoy in the active years of retirement! It is upside down and backwards!

With our low-interest rate environment, it’s difficult to find sustainability in your portfolio. One way to extend the life of your capital is to consider equities in the form of dividend earning stock.

This tends to be a source of hedging against tax, inflation, fees and other wealth transfers, however, using equities means taking more risk.

Who wants to take more risk leading into retirement?

If you would like advice on reducing the risk, or with what type of investment vehicle may be best for your situation please contact us at info@Henleyfinancial.ca

Visit us at at Henley Financial and Wealth Management

If indeed you are investing in equities please understand the risk involved within your investable assets. Investing in equities will depend on your risk tolerance and the reality of the situation. During retirement, you should lower the amount of Equities within your portfolio to protect you against the volatility of the markets. Leading up to retirement Equities can help build your portfolio but you must be able to accept the risk of volatility which the markets will provide.

Guaranteed Lifetime Withdrawal Benefit products offer a guaranteed income bonus and can provide a stable environment for investments moving forward with the option of a guaranteed lifetime income. This takes the guess work out the planning and provides you with a pension like asset.

Another strategy is to have adequate permanent life/asset insurance that frees up other assets such as non-registered savings, investment property equity or retained earnings in a business.

Having enough life insurance allows one to spend down taxable savings RRSP’s or RRIF’s during early/active retirement years (age 60-75) whereby you’re actually reducing the tax burden overall.

By deferring the use of RRSP’s and RRIF’s the tax on these assets is actually growing as invested capital. By using the funds sooner, rather than later, (yes you are paying more tax now) but you are paying a known tax, you have control over what the tax amounts are. If you wait long enough the government dictates the amount of tax owed yearly. Meaning if you defer too long, one conceivably can pay a much greater tax than ever saved by using the registered plan strategy!

Access equity sitting dormant in your paid off or very low debt home could also be a strategy that you could use during retirement. The reverse mortgage has been a component of retirement planning  over the last few years based on the low-interest rates on borrowed money. Again this strategy requires some professional advice.

Life insurance lowers the pressure of the capital to perform and lessens market volatility risk. It also lessens government control risk. Meaning, by using a registered plan strategy you absolutely are in a partnership with the government. RRSP and RRIF products are very much a controlled revenue source for the C.R.A. your strategy will dictate the how much income they will receive on your behalf.

If you are interested in creating more spendable income during the early retirement years without fear of running out of money we can show you how. For the most part, we can increase your spendable income into and during retirement without any additional out of pocket expense!

If we can recover 1%-5% of gross income from dollars that are unnecessarily being transferred away from you through tax, fees and other opportunity costs which can be redistributed to your retirement plan and increase lifestyle along the way. Would you be interested?

Let us provide you with an overall review of your entire investment and financial plan. We will do this with no obligation from you to move forward with any recommendations we may have, or we may find that you are well on your way and continue on that path. Either way, a second opinion never hurt anyone.

Ask yourself these 10 questions? They will help you decide if you are ready…

1. When do you want to retire?

2. What percentage of your current income do you expect to need in retirement?

3. How do you plan to spend your money in retirement?

4. Have you considered your lifestyle needs in retirement?

5. What guaranteed sources of income can you count on in retirement?

6. Do you plan to work part-time or full-time in retirement?

7. How do health and wellness factor into your retirement plan?

8. Are you ready for the unexpected events in life?

9. How will you keep your money working in retirement?

10. Do you plan to leave a legacy?

Like everyone around you saving has become second nature. You have saved wisely and built a sizeable retirement fund to provide for your retirement.  The next question is one that will confuse many… Are you ready?

imagesThink about how you will keep your money growing. Talk to a financial security advisor about investment solutions for retirees.

Let us help you at Henley Financial & Wealth Management.

Contact us at information@henleyfinancial.ca for more information regarding investment solutions.

Above are 10 questions… Questions that need answers so that you can retire into the lifestyle that you have become familiar with living. Studies show us that you spend more money on the weekends (or days off) because these are generally the days you have time to spend your hard earned money. So consider this in retirement every day is a weekend or a day off.

When do you want to retire? This is a personal question with many variables being attached for each individual. How much money do you have saved? Do you like your job? Are you healthy? When we change over from a saving to spending cycle the timing of your retirement is crucial to building a fund and assessing how long you will need it to last. If you like your job you may want to work longer as a consultant, this will help fund your retirement income. Although health will be the biggest factor to your retirement date, many workers are forced into retirement, not because of age but health issues. I guess it comes down to want to retire or need to retire hopefully the decision is yours to make.

What percentage of your income today will you need in the future to retire? This is a number that needs to be calculated into the retirement plan. Most financial advisors will show you a figure of 75% of today’s income going forward. To be honest that is a generous figure. Most of your big-ticket items will have been paid for by this time. You must remember however that you will are likely to make the most income in your lifetime during the last 5 years of employment before you retire. So your final valuation is something that must be continually updated while planning for the future.

What are your current spending habits? Are you a saver or a spender? Because these habits will not likely change in retirement, and as always you must plan for the unexpected events which will be out of your control. It goes without saying savers are more likely to save more and have more than the spenders, so spenders must work to save more now to have more in retirement. This is a common sense approach but you would be surprized by the lack of respect for compounding interest and how it works in your favor over time.

imagesHow many days a year will you travel or play golf? If you retire at age 65 and live till the age of 90… meaning you will have less than 10,000 days or 9,125 days to be exact. That would be a fair amount of travel and golf for anyone; some planning will have to be involved regarding the answer to those questions. I believe these answers to be the top answers to the question of… what do you want to do when you retire? So to live that lifestyle you will have to plan for future expenses that you may not already have. If you buy a condo in Florida you will have to account for the condo fees and associated upkeep costs of two homes to allow for the travel and golf adventure you have planned. If you plan to travel the world you will have to account for the currency exchange rates and the costs associated with travel to the exotic locations you want to visit.

Calculate how much income you’ll receive during retirement – from sources such as Canada Pension Plan (CPP), Quebec Pension Plan (QPP), and Old Age Security (OAS) payments. Then, determine how much additional income you’ll need and where this will come from. While investment income is a nice bonus, you shouldn’t rely on it to pay for necessities.

When you consider retirement planning, make sure to account for unpredictable events – both financial and personal. As we said before plan for the unexpected. Make sure your retirement savings are strong enough to support you through a future economic downturn, and a rise in the cost of living and a long life.

If you plan for the future you will be able to enjoy life to the fullest, if you fail to plan for the future it will get away from you and your plans will have to be alterred. The choice is yours choose wisely.

 

 

You don’t have to die to win!

When you buy Life Insurance you buy it for a good reason.  Generally, there is a need. Whatever the need there are two types of life insurance Term and Whole life.

The problem that arises within our human nature is that we tend to abandon anything that has a proven track record for a hot tip or a fast-tracked value added program. If people don’t understand something they tend to believe that it’s too good to be true, or it’s some kind of a scam. Unfortunately, the people with little knowledge always manage to pass along their expertise on a subject they know very little about.

Understand how you can benefit from insuring yourself today and spending tax-free in the future by contacting us at Info@henleyfinancial.ca for more information regarding the legacy of spending tax -free.

We can help you @ Henley Financial & Wealth Management we understand how this solution can best work for you and your family’s financial security.

Let’s explore the two types of insurance… Term and Whole Life

Term – is a type of life insurance policy that provides coverage for a certain period of time or a specified “term” of years. If the insured dies during the time period specified in the policy and the policy remains active – or in force – then a death benefit will be paid.

Therefore, the best day to die when purchasing a term policy is the day after you pay your first premium. It will never be worth more to your family’s financial security after that day. If you could tell me the day you are going to die and we could sell you insurance the day before then I would tell you to buy more term than you can afford.

Understandably a term policy is a short-term solution for a family with budget restraints, it has merit and a protection value. It has its place in many households and the coverage cannot be undervalued when looking at the financial security needs of the family.

Whole life – A life insurance contract with level premiums that has both an insurance and an investment component. The insurance component pays a stated amount upon the death of the insured. The investment component accumulates a cash value that the policyholder can withdraw or borrow against.

If you plan properly a legacy can be created with a large or small amount of money, which will create the greatest amount of wealth in a tax-free program. Because of how these policies are created there is a cash accumulation side to this insurance product. Any dollar value that fits into your own financial scenario will create a result, which has the ability to earn uninterrupted compounding values, create liquidity, and provide for collateralization, all this leads to the utilization of opportunity costs.images

Using an insurance portfolio where dividends are guaranteed, once they are paid on the anniversary of the policy. You control the rate of return in your program without allowing the volatility of the market to affect your rate of return. All that is asked of you is that you contribute your premiums to yourself and your future. I refer to this as having an umbrella that will protect you for the future while providing for that tax-free rainy day.

If I told you… you could create a legacy like the Trudeau Family or the Kennedy’s, you would not believe that to be true. We know the dollar value might be different but the strategy is the same regardless of your last name. Most big family names you associate wealth with have used this strategy over generations to create and protect the wealth they have today.

If you knew what you know today – yesterday, would you be interested in the result?  I believe most of us would say yes. Which means the value of hindsight understands the value of knowledge gained from our past. In life, we always want to believe that we are doing the best we can to create our own financial security based on the knowledge we have learned from our past.

Therefore, the challenge is upon you to create a safe financial family security blanket for yourself and your family. Win before you die!